DEMO Glossary


This is a short DEMO glossary also showing the auto-linking capability for the lessons.

Browse the glossary using this index

Special | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | ALL

A

AGL


AGL

Above Ground Level or height. This is the actual height between the aircraft and the ground.


Entry link: AGL

AP


AP

Abbreviation for AutoPilot.


Entry link: AP

C

C.G.


C.G.

Center of Gravity

The center of gravity is a geometrical position around which mass the mass of the object is evenly distributed.


Example 1.

C.G. example 1

Example 2.

C.G. example 2
Entry link: C.G.

CAUTION!


CAUTION!

Disregarding the following instructions leads to serious deterioration of flight safety.


Entry link: CAUTION!

CHT


Cylinder Head Temperature

Cylinder Head Temperature is measured by a temperature sensor in the cylinder head. It is an extremely important data, since it can prevent thermal damage to the cylinder (overcooling or overheating).


Entry link: CHT

D

DA


DA

Density Altitude is the altitude relative to the standard atmosphere conditions at which the air density would be equal to the indicated air density at the place of observation. In other words, density altitude is air density given as a height above mean sea level


Entry link: DA

E

EGT


EGT

Exhaust Gas Temperature is the temperature of the exhaust leaving the engine. It is a direct indication of the combustion in the cylinders. The temperature probe for the EGT is located in the exhaust system very near the exhaust valve.


Entry link: EGT

EMS


EMS

Engine Monitoring System

A portion of the Skyview with the engine data (temperatures, pressures and fuel) displayed.


Entry link: EMS

G

G


G

Factor of gravity. It is used to express the apparent increase of mass due to inertia. While the actual mass of an object remains the same, during manouvering this object is apparently heavier. The G factor quantifies how much heavier.


Example:

A mass of a pilot is 80 kg. When manouvering at 3G, the pilot mass is still 80 kg, but the apparent mass that the seat has to carry is 3 (G) X 80 kg = 240 kg.


Entry link: G

GRS


GRS

Galaxy Rescue System is a whole-aircraft-parachute that is deployed in an emergency by pulling an activation handle in the cockpit.


Entry link: GRS

GS


GS

Ground Speed is the velocity with which the aircraft passes over the terrain. It is normally measured by GPS


Entry link: GS

I

IAS


IAS

Indiciated AirSpeed

The airspeed shown on the instrument(s). It is an almost direct representation of dynamic pressure exerted on the aircraft.


Entry link: IAS

M

MAP


MAP

MAnifold Pressure is pressure in the intake manifold before the intake valve. It is a measure of how much the throttle is opened.

It is almost always measured in inches or mercury (in.Hg)

Combined with the RPM it provides the power setting information for a piston engine.


Entry link: MAP

MTOM


MTOM

Maximum Take-Off Mass

The maximum takeoff mass also known as maximum takeoff weight (MTOW) of an aircraft is the maximum mass at which the pilot of the aircraft is allowed to attempt to take off, due to structural or other limits.

This mass is absolute and does not vary with atmospheric conditions, flap settings or anything else.


Entry link: MTOM

O

OAT


OAT

Outside Air Temperature

Temperature of the outside air measured by a probe on the aircraft.


Entry link: OAT

P

PFD


PFD

Primary Flight Display

A portion of the Skyview with the basic flying instruments (airspeed, altitude, pitch, roll, sideslip, heading etc.) displayed.


Entry link: PFD

R

RPM


RPM

Revolutions Per Minute is the measure of rotation speed.

If an object is turning with 2500 RPM it means it makes 2500 full rotations in one minute.


Entry link: RPM

T

TAS


TAS

True Air Speed of an aircraft is the speed of the aircraft relative to the airmass in which it is flying.


Entry link: TAS

V

Venturi


The Venturi effect is a reduction of pressure in a fluid (gas or liquid) that results when this fluid flows through a reduced cross section.

The most typical examples of the Venturi effect in aviation are the carburators and older types of airspeed measuring devices (called Venturi tubes...).


Entry link: Venturi

W

WARNING!


WARNING!

Disregarding the following instructions leads to severe deterioration of flight safety and hazardous situations, including such resulting in injury and loss of life. 


Entry link: WARNING!